Sunday, 1 April, 2018 - 13:00

If you live in Wales, are aged 11-18 and want to take part in the Welsh Youth Parliament you will not be allowed to disclose your party affiliation.

The Welsh Government announced the end to their consultation in November 2017 and have decided on the particulars surrounding the Welsh Youth Parliament, despite never publishing the results of the consultation.

Those aged 11-18 are permitted to take part, the first elections will be November 2018 and there will be 60 members but none are allowed to disclose their party association(s). Indeed it is unclear if any register of...

Contact Name:
Mark Chapman / David A Elston

Press Hit: Should all internet data be treated the same?

Is the internet about to change forever? Could removing net neutrality rules turn it into a place of the ‘haves’ and the ‘have-nots’, where rich firms pay for their content to join fast lanes while the rest get left behind? Or will the consumer get more choice on a faster internet?

Donald Trump and his team have recently overturned Obama-era rules on net neutrality, and that means internet providers can offer fast lanes where richer companies pay for the best connections to their consumers.The question is - does that mean rich firms have an advantage over new companies who can’t afford to overtake?

At the Roundtable was Emily Taylor, Editor of the Journal of Cyber Policy; Mark Chapman, from the UK Pirate Party; Sam Dumitriu, Head of Research at the Adam Smith Institute; and Ian Walden, Head of the Institute of Computer and Communications Law at Queen Mary, University of London.

Roundtable is a discussion programme with an edge. Broadcast out of London and presented by David Foster, it's about bringing people to the table, listening to every opinion, and analysing every point of view. From fierce debate to reflective thinking, Roundtable discussions offer a different perspective on the issues that matter to you. Watch it every weekday at 15:30 GMT on TRT World.

Thursday, 5 April, 2018 - 16:30

Standing down but not walking away

David Elston's picture

Did anybody catch the last three years? I blinked.

I’ve been a member of the Pirate Party UK since 2014. In that time I’ve stood in seven different elections, held four different positions and…

...as I type this I feel, this isn’t what anyone is interested in. We’ve all contributed to the party substantially and no one need list their contributions. To each of us, we gave something of great importance and at times, we no doubt questioned if we could afford to, but we did so willingly anyway.

I’ll always be tremendously grateful to everyone who found the courage to band together on what some may describe as a journey but at times felt more like a siege to protect our liberties.

‘UK teen almost hacking US officials a serious concern for American security’

It should be very concerning for the US security services that a teenager almost got to access to private information of top officials, including that of the CIA chief, as other hackers might actually do some real harm, Mark Chapman of the UK Pirate Party believes.

Sunday, 8 October, 2017 - 14:15

Operation Doubloons is live!

Friday, 2 June, 2017 - 17:45

Our 2017 snap general election crowdfunder has just gone live. Score yourself some Pirate booty, and help make politics a little bit better at the same time.

Government and Main Parties Point the Finger at Social Media for Terrorist Attack

David Elston's picture

While Manchester still grieves, there are those who have already started using the event to further their own political agenda.

As soon as the election is over, the government will seek to immediately pass new powers allowing the police and MI5 to remove all encryption from services such as WhatsApp and Facebook, despite social media providers' stringent opposition to any action weakening encryption. Further to this, non-partisan professionals such as Open Rights Group (ORG) have also continually raised their opposition to providing a back door to encryption, since it entirely destroys the concept of security.

Despite both campaigners and business professionals warning against it, the government is locked on this dangerous course.

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